Our Students

Fatima, Lafayette College '20

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Bahara, Drew University '20

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Qamarnisa, Wagner College '20

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Yasameen, Bucknell University '20

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Simin, Smith College '20

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Tohfa, Hollins University ' 21

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Farida, Wellesley College '22

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Frozan, Drew University '22

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Hanifa, Trinity College '22

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Khadija, Bard College '23

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Fatima, American University of Central Asia '20

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Shah, American University of Afghanistan '20

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Strategic Educational Scholar

Zinat, Gawharshad University '22

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Project Based Scholar

Ziafatullah, American University of Afghanistan '22

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Strategic Educational Scholar

Omid, American University of Afghanistan '23

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In-country Scholar

Shaima, Marefat High School '22

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High School Scholar - Afghanistan

Colleges Attended

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  • AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF AFGHANISTAN
  • AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ASIA
  • BARD COLLEGE
  • BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 
  • COLLEGE OF ST. ELIZABETH
  • CONNECTICUT COLLEGE 
  • DICKINSON COLLEGE
  • DREW UNIVERSITY
  • GAWHARSHAD UNIVERSITY
  • GOUCHER COLLEGE
  • HOLLINS UNIVERSITY
  • ​LAFAYETTE COLLEGE
  • LYNCHBURG COLLEGE​
  • MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE
  • MUHLENBERG COLLEGE
  • OBERLIN COLLEGE
  • PIEDMONT COMMUNITY COLLEGE
  • RUTGERS UNIVERSITY
  • SKIDMORE COLLEGE
  • SMITH COLLEGE
  • ​TRINITY COLLEGE
  • UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC
  • WAGNER COLLEGE
  • WASHINGTON & LEE UNIVERSITY
  • WELLESLEY COLLEGE
  • WILKES UNIVERSITY
  • YALE UNIVERSITY

How it all began...

In 2008 a young Afghan girl who was attending Blair Academy...

 ...could not afford to pay for college.  She came to the attention of several individuals who decided to help – who decided to make a difference – and AGFAF was born. Today AGFAF has helped over 50 scholars with their educational expenses.  


However, the story of AGFAF begins long before 2008. It began years earlier when Afghanistan was seized by civil war and women and girls were subjugated by the Taliban and forced out of society and into their homes. During this time women were denied access to education. Although Afghanistan is rebuilding after the years of being torn down, girls still continue to pursue education at great risk to their own and their family’s life.   


This is the common story of Afghanistan, but each of our girls has her own story.  Each student is unique and brings her own strengths and experience to AGFAF.  One comes from a loving home where education is highly valued.  She has grown up in a world of books and knowledge.  Another comes from a home shattered by war.  She has grown up in a world of pain and sorrow; siblings and parents senselessly lost.  Some are refugees who have moved away and back – back to the motherland they love.   ​ 

There are many stories, but what these students do have in common is hope and commitment.  Hope for a brighter future for themselves and Afghanistan and the commitment to making a change. They understand the power of education and how this education can transform the Afghanistan of today to their dreams of tomorrow.  AGFAF supports these students and their dream because we too believe education can make a difference – for these girls, for Afghanistan and for the world.   

Shamila Kohestani, AGFAF's first graduate.
Shamila Kohestani, AGFAF's first graduate.